Teen Reading List – Unmasked!

Fiction
An Abundance of Katherines, by John Green (Age: 12 and up)
When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine. And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped. Nineteen times, to be exact. On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washed-up child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight, Judge Judy–loving best friend riding shotgun—but no Katherines. Colin is on a mission to prove “The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability”, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship, avenge Dumpees everywhere, and finally win him the girl. Love, friendship, and a dead Austro-Hungarian archduke add up to surprising and heart-changing conclusions in this ingeniously layered comic novel about reinventing oneself.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney (Age: 12 and up)
Bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the “rez” to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.

The Carnival at Bray. By Jessie Ann Foley (Age 13 and up)
Maggie has only recently moved to Ireland when tragedy strikes and her goal becomes seeing Nirvana perform in Rome.

The Crossover. By Kwame Alexander (Age 14 and up)
Josh, aka Filthy, is a twin, a talented basketball star, and a son who adores his father but discovers parents are not infallible. Josh and Jordan must come to grips with growing up on and off the court to realize breaking the rules comes at a terrible price, as their story’s heart-stopping climax proves a game-changer for the entire family.

A Court of Thorns and Roses, by Sarah J. Maas (Ages 14 and up)
When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a beast-like creature arrives to demand retribution for it. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she only knows about from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not an animal, but Tamlin-one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled their world.

Insurgent, by Veronica Roth (Ages 13 and up)
As war surges in the factions of dystopian Chicago all around her, Tris attempts to save those she loves—and herself—while grappling with haunting questions of grief and forgiveness, identity and loyalty, politics and love.

An Ember in the Ashes, by Sabaa Tahir (Ages 14 and up)
Laia’s adventures begin after her brother is taken captive by the reigning, warlike Martials, who have subjugated her people, the Scholars. In an attempt to save him, she enters into a dangerous agreement with the Resistance to spy on the fiendish commandant of the Martial’s military academy.

Elenor and Park, by Rainbow Rowell (Ages 14 and up)
Eleanor, 15, is the new girl at school and bullied because she’s overweight and dresses in a flamboyant manner. Park is a half-Korean boy who has lived in Omaha, Nebraska, all his life but still feels like an outsider. This is a story of first love, which very slowly builds from the first day Eleanor sits next to Park on the school bus.

Far from you, By Tess Sharpe (Ages 14 and up)
The day Sophie is released from rehab starts the “now” of this story, which alternates with flashbacks from the past. She has had two close calls with death, the first in a crippling car crash with her friend Mina and Mina’s brother Trev. The second was when Mina was murdered in front of her in what is assumed to be a drug deal gone wrong.

I’ll Give You the Sun. By Jandy Nelson (Ages 14 and up)
Jude and her twin brother, Noah, are incredibly close. At thirteen, isolated Noah draws constantly and is falling in love with the charismatic boy next door, while daredevil Jude cliff-dives and wears red-red lipstick and does the talking for both of them. But three years later, Jude and Noah are barely speaking. Something has happened to wreck the twins in different and dramatic ways . . . until Jude meets a cocky, broken, beautiful boy, as well as someone else—an even more unpredictable new force in her life. The early years are Noah’s story to tell. The later years are Jude’s. What the twins don’t realize is that they each have only half the story, and if they could just find their way back to one another, they’d have a chance to remake their world.

The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely (Ages 13 and up)
As sixteen-year-old Aidan Donovan’s fractured family disintegrates around him, he searches for solace in a few bumps of Adderall, his father’s wet bar, and the attentions of his local priest, —the only adult who actually listens to him. Aidan turns to Father Greg for love and comfort, an act that transforms into something dark and unexpected.

Jackaby by William Ritter. (Ages 12 and up)
Answering an odd help-wanted ad that cautions “Do not stare at the frog,” Abigail finds that her life is about to change in ways she couldn’t have imagined.

Looking for Alaska by John Green (Ages 14 and up)
Halter is done with his safe life at home. His whole life has been one big non-event, and his obsession with famous last words has only made him crave “the Great Perhaps” even more (Francois Rabelais, poet). He heads off to the sometimes crazy and anything-but-boring world of Culver Creek Boarding School, and his life becomes the opposite of safe. Because down the hall is Alaska Young.

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, by Jesse Andrews (Ages 14 and up)
It is a universally acknowledged truth that high school sucks. But on the first day of his senior year, Greg Gaines thinks he’s figured it out. The answer to the basic existential question: How is it possible to exist in a place that sucks so badly? His strategy: remain at the periphery at all times. Keep an insanely low profile. Make mediocre films with the one person who is even sort of his friend, Earl.

Hollow City: The Second Novel of Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs. (Ages 12 and up)
September 3, 1940. Ten peculiar children flee an army of deadly monsters. And only one person can help them—but she’s trapped in the body of a bird. The extraordinary journey that began in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children continues as Jacob Portman and his newfound friends’ journey to London, the peculiar capital of the world. There, they hope to find a cure for their beloved headmistress, Miss Peregrine. But in this war-torn city, hideous surprises lurk around every corner.

Noggin. By John Corey Whaley. (Ages 14 and up)
Travis Coates has lost his head—literally. Dying of leukemia, he has had his noggin surgically removed and cryogenically frozen. But when he’s revived, all is not the same as it once was.

Paper Towns, by John Green (Ages 14 and up)
Quentin Jacobsen has spent a lifetime loving the magnificent Margo Roth Spiegelman from afar. So when she cracks open a window and climbs back into his life—summoning him for an ingenious campaign of revenge—he follows. When their all-nighter ends and a new day breaks, Margo has disappeared. But Q soon learns that there are clues—and they’re for him. Embarking on an exhilarating adventure to find her, the closer Q gets, the less he sees the girl he thought he knew.

P.S. I Still Love You, by Jenny Han. (Ages 12 and up)
Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter. She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever. When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once?

Red Queen, by Victoria Aveyard. (Ages 14 and up)
A girl with a special power lives in a kingdom divided between an underclass with red blood and an elite with silver.

Saint Anything, by Sarah Dessen (Ages 12 and up)
Sydney has always felt invisible. She’s grown accustomed to her brother, Peyton, being the focus of the family’s attention and, lately, concern. Peyton is handsome and charismatic, but seems bent on self-destruction. Now, after a drunk-driving accident that crippled a boy, Peyton’s serving some serious jail time, and Sydney is on her own, questioning her place in the family and the world.

The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim. by E. K. Johnston. (Ages 13 and up)
Dragons live everywhere and they’re threatening to exterminate a Canadian town unless dragon slayer Owen, and his bard Siobhan, come up with a plan to save them all.

Vango. by Timothee de Fombelle. (Ages 10 and up)
Moments before his ordination as a priest, 19-year-old Vango, falsely accused of murder, must flee for his life.

We Were Liars. by E. Lockhart (Ages 14 and up).
Suffering from serious injuries, Cadence doesn’t remember much from the summer of her fifteenth year on Beechwood Island. Two years later, she returns to try to fill in the gaps.

The Young Elites. by Marie Lu. Putnam, (Ages 12 and up).
Adelina Amouteru is a survivor of the blood fever. A decade ago, the deadly illness swept through her nation. Most of the infected perished, while many of the children who survived were left with strange markings. Adelina’s black hair turned silver, her lashes went pale, and now she has only a jagged scar where her left eye once was. Her cruel father believes she is a malfetto, an abomination, ruining their family’s good name and standing in the way of their fortune. But some of the fever’s survivors are rumored to possess more than just scars—they are believed to have mysterious and powerful gifts, and though their identities remain secret, they have come to be called the Young Elites.

Vampire Academy, by Richelle Mead (Ages 12 and up)
If you like vampires and high school drama, Richelle Mead’s Vampire Academy is perfect for you. A New York Times best seller, the book follows Rose Hathaway, a half-human, half-vampire teen who’s training to be a bodyguard for royal vampires.

Steelheart, Brandon Sanderson (Ages 12 and up)
When David was six, an unexplained explosion in the sky caused perpetual darkness and ordinary people to gain supernatural powers. These people became known as Epics. Two years later, in a bank in what was once Chicago, now called Newcago, David witnessed Steelheart, one of the most powerful Epics of all, murder his father. In the 10 years since his father’s death, David has made it his mission to learn all he can about Epics. Everyone thinks they are invincible, but he knows otherwise.

The Selection, by Kiera Cass – (Ages 12 and up)
If you like The Bachelor and The Hunger Games, chances are you will love The Selection by Kiera Cass. Set in a dystopian society where a prince has a “Bachelor style” contest to find his bride, the book follows America Singer — a teenage girl picked to participate against her wishes.
Non Fiction
Assuming Names (Criminal Mischief #1) By Tanya Thompson. (Ages 12 and up)
The detectives were embarrassed but they still wanted answered, “How did a 15-year-old runaway successfully pose as a world traveled countess?” The newspapers turned it back on them, practically sneering, “How did she do it while under investigation by the FBI, DEA, and Interpol?” The Mafia had been demanding the same thing for six months, “What is your real name?” And the psychologists asked the question they always ask, “Why?”
It’s the why of it that will keep a girl in trouble. Assuming Names is the true story of a young con artist. It’s the tale of a runaway that assumed the title of Countess and then went on to fool the FBI, DEA, and Interpol—as well as a number of other celebrities and institutions—with an elaborate tale of world intrigue.

Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon By Steve Sheinkin. (Ages: 10 and up)
In December of 1938, a chemist in a German laboratory made a shocking discovery: When placed next to radioactive material, a Uranium atom split in two. That simple discovery launched a scientific race that spanned 3 continents. In Great Britain and the United States, Soviet spies worked their way into the scientific community; in Norway, a commando force slipped behind enemy lines to attack German heavy-water manufacturing; and deep in the desert, one brilliant group of scientists was hidden away at a remote site at Los Alamos. This is the story of the plotting, the risk-taking, the deceit, and genius that created the world’s most formidable weapon. This is the story of the atomic bomb.

The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the fall of Imperial Russia By Candace Fleming. (Ages 12 and up)
History comes to vivid life in Fleming’s sweeping story of the dramatic decline and fall of the House of Romanov. Her account provides not only intimate portraits of Tsar Nicholas; his wife, Alexandra; and the five Romanov children, but it also offers a beautifully realized examination of the context of their lives—Russia in a state of increasing social unrest and turmoil.

Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who Challenged Big Business—and Won! By Emily Arnold McCully, (Ages 12 and up)
Born before the Civil War and living in what was truly a man’s world, Ida Tarbell was one of the first practitioners of what we now call investigative journalism. Although she is not well known today, she made a name for herself in her own time by taking on the exploitative practices of John D. Rockefeller and the Standard Oil Company. In this fine biography that also serves as a social history of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, McCully presents a readable and captivating account of this unusual woman, showing the reader her inconsistencies and faults as well as the grit, determination, and intellect that allowed Tarbell to support herself and her family with her writing.

Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw, (Ages14 and up)
In this focused, intelligent, and most of all hilarious memoir, Shane Burcaw recalls both the normal and deeply unique experiences he has endured living with spinal muscular atrophy. With a sharp wit, Burcaw is self-deprecating but never defeatist, even in the face of his terminal condition. His anecdotal essays are thought-provoking, and his whip-smart style puts him in a league with some of today’s best humorists. In his eminently readable and relatable memoir, Burcaw’s positive attitude is inspirational without being the least bit cloying.

Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek by Maya Van Wagenen, (Ages 12 and up)
This memoir of Maya Van Wagenen’s eighth grade year is one part 1950s popularity guidebook mixed with two parts courage and one truly modern geek girl. She uses Betty Cornell’s Teenage Popularity Guide to take on the social hierarchy of her school and manages to achieve acceptance and understanding.

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin, (Ages 12 and up)
As World War II escalated overseas, African American sailors at Port Chicago were under pressure to load bombs faster and faster onto waiting ships, until finally a horrific explosion killed hundreds. In the days that followed, 50 men refused to work under such unsafe conditions and were charged with mutiny. Sheinkin masterfully weaves interviews, court records, and other primary sources with his driving narrative to tell the complex and little-known history of the Port Chicago Disaster of 1944. Tightly written, this slim volume is rich in information about the history of a segregated military, the emerging civil rights movement, and the exceptional leaders and individuals of the time.
Great Graphic Novels
Afterlife with Archie: Escape from Riverdale. By Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. Illus. by Francesco Francavilla. (Ages 12 and up)
A zombie outbreak in Riverdale forces Archie and his fellow survivors to take refuge in Veronica’s mansion.

Bad Machinery V.3: The Case of the Simple Soul. By John Allison. Illus. by the author. (Ages 12 and up)
Linton and Sonny investigate who has been setting fire to old barns. Could it be the troll living under the bridge?

Drama, by Raina Telgemeie, (Age: 10 and up)
Callie loves theater. And while she would totally try out for her middle school’s production of Moon over Mississippi, she’s a terrible singer. Instead she’s the set designer for the stage crew, and this year she’s determined to create a set worthy of Broadway on a middle-school budget. But how can she, when she doesn’t know much about carpentry, ticket sales are down, and the crew members are having trouble working together? Not to mention the onstage AND offstage drama that occurs once the actors are chosen, and when two cute brothers enter the picture, things get even crazier!

47 Ronin by Mike Richardson. Illus. by Stan Sakai. Dark Horse, (Ages 12 and up)
The Japanese Legend of the 47 Ronin and their epic mission to avenge their wronged master.

In Real Life, by Cory Doctorow, illus.by Jen Wang (Ages 15 and up)
Anda loves Coarsegold Online, the massively-multiplayer role playing game that she spends most of her free time on. It’s a place where she can be a leader, a fighter, a hero. It’s a place where she can meet people from all over the world, and make friends. Gaming is, for Anda, entirely a good thing.

Ms. Marvel: V.1. No Normal by G. Willow Wison. Illus. by Adrian Alphona. Marvel, (Ages 12 and up)
Kamala Khan is a geeky teenager navigating her Muslim identity and parents’ expectations when she gains bizarre and inexplicable powers.

Seconds: a Graphic Novel by Bryan Lee O’Malley. Illus. by the author (Ages 12 and up)
Katie’s got it pretty good. She’s a talented young chef, she runs a successful restaurant, and she has big plans to open an even better one. Then, all at once, progress on the new location bogs down, her charming ex-boyfriend pops up, her fling with another chef goes sour, and her best waitress gets badly hurt. And just like that, Katie’s life goes from pretty good to not so much. What she needs is a second chance. Everybody deserves one, after all—but they don’t come easy. Luckily for Katie, a mysterious girl appears in the middle of the night with simple instructions for a do-it-yourself do-over.

The Shadow Hero by Gene Luen Yang. Illus. by Sonny Liew. (Ages 12 and up)
Hank Chu helps around his family’s grocery store when his mother makes him a superhero suit, and offers to give him rides to fight crime.

Sisters, by Raina Telgemeie, (Ages 8 and up)
Raina can’t wait to be a big sister. But once Amara is born, things aren’t quite how she expected them to be. Amara is cute, but she’s also a cranky, grouchy baby, and mostly prefers to play by herself. Their relationship doesn’t improve much over the years, but when a baby brother enters the picture and later, something doesn’t seem right between their parents, they realize they must figure out how to get along. They are sisters, after all.

Smile, by Raina Telgemeie, Graphix (Ages 10 and up)
Raina just wants to be a normal sixth grader. But one night after Girl Scouts she trips and falls, severely injuring her two front teeth. What follows is a long and frustrating journey with on-again, off-again braces, surgery, embarrassing headgear, and even a retainer with fake teeth attached. And on top of all that, there’s still more to deal with: a major earthquake, boy confusion, and friends who turn out to be not so friendly.

Tell me again how a crush should feel by Sara Farizan, (Ages 15 and up)
High school junior Leila’s Persian heritage already makes her different from her classmates at Armstead Academy, and if word got out that she liked girls life would be twice as hard, but when a new girl, Saskia, shows up, Leila starts to take risks she never thought she would, especially when it looks as if the attraction between them is mutual, so she struggles to sort out her growing feelings by confiding in her old friends.

Through The Woods by Emily Carroll. Illus. by the author. Margaret K. McElderry Books, (Ages 12 and up).
Five tales of sinister things that live in the woods.

Trillium by Jeff Lemire. Illus. by the author (Ages 12 and up).
The twentieth and thirty-eighth centuries meet in a time-travel romance.

Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki by Mamoru Hosoda. Illus. (Ages 12 and up)
Hana must raise two werewolf children on her own after their father dies in an accident.
Top Ten Audio Books
The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley. (Ages 15 and up)
Maggie has only recently moved to Ireland when tragedy strikes and her goal becomes seeing Nirvana perform in Rome.

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander. Houghton, (Ages 9 and up)
Josh, aka Filthy, is a twin, a talented basketball star, and a son who adores his father but discovers parents are not infallible.

The Gospel of winter by Brendan Kiely. Simon & Schuster/Margaret K. McElderry (Ages 15 and up)
As Aidan’s family disintegrates, he turns to Father Greg for love and comfort, an act that transforms into something dark and unexpected.

I’ll Give You the Sun. by Jandy Nelson. Dial, (Ages 14 and up)
Jude and her twin brother, Noah, are incredibly close. At thirteen, isolated Noah draws constantly and is falling in love with the charismatic boy next door, while daredevil Jude cliff-dives and wears red-red lipstick and does the talking for both of them. But three years later, Jude and Noah are barely speaking. Something has happened to wreck the twins in different and dramatic ways . . .

Jackaby by William Ritter, (Ages 12 and up)
Answering an odd help-wanted ad that cautions “Do not stare at the frog,” Abigail finds that her life is about to change in ways she couldn’t have imagined.

Noggin by John Corey Whaley. (Ages 14 and up).
Travis Coates has lost his head—literally. Dying of leukemia, he has had his noggin surgically removed and cryogenically frozen. But when he’s revived, all is not the same as it once was.

The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim by E. K. Johnston. (Ages 12 and up)
Dragons live everywhere and they’re threatening to exterminate a Canadian town unless dragon slayer Owen, and his bard Siobhan, come up with a plan to save them all.

Vango; Between Sky and Earth by Timothee de Fombelle (Ages 10 and up)
In a world between wars, a young man on the cusp of taking priestly vows is suddenly made a fugitive. Fleeing the accusations of police who blame him for a murder, as well as more sinister forces with darker intentions, Vango attempts to trace the secrets of his shrouded past and prove his innocence before all is lost.

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart. Delacorte (Ages 14 and up)
Suffering from serious injuries, Cadence doesn’t remember much from the summer of her fifteenth year on Beechwood Island. Two years later, she returns to try to fill in the gaps.

The Young Elites by Marie Lu. Putnam (Ages 13 and up)
An intense fantasy about Adelina, an outsider girl who is rescued by the legendary Reaper, the leader of the Young Elites. But can Adelina keep her friends and sister safe?
Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers
Non-Fiction
Batman Science: The Real-World Science Behind Batman’s Gear by Enz, Tammy and Biskup, Agnieszka, Illus. (Ages 12 and up)
When it comes to fighting crime, technology is Batmans greatest weapon. From his gadget-packed Utility Belt to his high-tech Batmobile, the Dark Knight tackles Gothams criminal underworld. But does any of his gear have a basis in reality? Or is it merely the stuff of fiction? Batman Science uncovers the real-world connections to Batmans techand much of it will surprise you!

Find Momo: A Photography Book by Andrew Knapp,. Illus. (Ages – all)
Momo the Border collie is hiding around the country—find him in each photo.

Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir by Liz Prince Illus. (Ages 14 and up)
Liz triumphs over gender labels in this witty comic memoir.

Fiction

Famous Last Words, Alender, Katie (Ages 13 and up)
Willa is freaking out. It seems like she’s seeing things. Like a dead body in her swimming pool. Frantic messages on her walls. A reflection that is not her own. It’s almost as if someone — or something — is trying to send her a message. (Ages 13 and up).

I am Pusheen the Cat. Claire Belton, (Ages 12 and up)
A day in the life of an adorable cartoon cat.

Gabi, A Girl in Pieces. Quintero (Ages 14 and up)
Gabi Hernandez chronicles her last year in high school in her diary: college applications, Cindy’s pregnancy, Sebastian’s coming out, the cute boys, her father’s meth habit, and the food she craves. And best of all, the poetry that helps forge her identity.

Juvie. 2013 Watkins, Steve. Candlewick Press (Ages 14 and up)
Sadie Windas has always been the responsible one — she’s the star player on her AAU basketball team, she gets good grades, she dates a cute soccer player, and she tries to help out at home. Not like her older sister, Carla, who leaves her three-year-old daughter, Lulu, with Aunt Sadie while she parties and gets high. But when both sisters are caught up in a drug deal — wrong place, wrong time — it falls to Sadie to confess to a crime she didn’t commit to keep Carla out of jail and Lulu out of foster care.

Ms. Marvel: No Normal. Wilson, G. Willow Illus. by Adrian Alphona (Ages 12 and up)
A Muslim teen and comic fan girl suddenly finds herself with superpowers.

Historical Fiction
A Great and Terrible Beauty, By Libba Bray (Ages 14 and up)
Sixteen-year-old Gemma has had an unconventional upbringing in India, until the day she foresees her mother’s death in a black, swirling vision that turns out to be true.

The Master Magician by Charlie N. Holmberg (Ages 14 and up)
Throughout her studies, Ceony Twill has harbored a secret, one she’s kept from even her mentor, Emery Thane. She’s discovered how to practice forms of magic other than her own—an ability long thought impossible.

Time’s Edge, By Rysa Walker, Series: The Chronos Files (Book 2) (Ages 12 and up)
To stop her sadistic grandfather, Saul, and his band of time travelers from rewriting history, Kate must race to retrieve the CHRONOS keys before they fall into the Cyrists’ hands. If she jumps back in time and pulls the wrong key—one that might tip off the Cyrists to her strategy—her whole plan could come crashing down, jeopardizing the future of millions of innocent people.

The Wrath and the Dawn, By Renee Ahdieh. (Ages 14 and up)
Every dawn brings horror to a different family in a land ruled by a killer. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, takes a new bride each night only to have her executed at sunrise.

The annotations for these titles were taken from Novelist K-8, and/or Amazon.com. The suggested ages are guidelines only. The Library recognizes that teens develop at different rates and in different ways and therefore encourages parents to be actively involved in helping determine the appropriateness of any of these titles for their individual teen.

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